Monthly Archives: April 2012

Afterwards, by Rosamund Lupton.

Mother (Grace) and daughter (Jenny) barely survive (a head injury, badly burned, respectively) a school fire… both in comas, they connect on some plane and unravel the mysteries of the blaze, as police officals do the same thing in the world below.

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When Captain Flint Was Still A Good Man, by Nick Dybek.

When Cal is a young boy, he is raised on adventure stories like those of Robert Louis Stevenson and when his father leaves the family every year to fish 6 months in Alaska, he can only imagine adventures.  One of those seasons, when Cal is still young, “adventure” hits close to home, literally.

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Wish You Were Here, by Graham Swift.

Those words (“Wish You Were Here“) are on the singular postcard Jack, as a vacationing child, sends to Ellie who will become his wife but they resonate on several levels in the novel, including the relationship between Jack and his brother Tom  who dies fighting in Iraq.

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The Song Remains The Same, by Allison Winn Scotch.

If you can stand another one– or if you’ve forgotten the others (there seems to be a spate of them lately)– this story of a woman’s amnesia, manifested after being one of two survivors of a plane crash, uses the device of song & music to remind her of what and who she was before.

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The Cove, by Ron Rash.

Because the cove is isolated and barely sees daylight, and because Laurel who lives there has a large strawberry birthmark, she and her brother are shunned. Townspeople believe she is a witch and that the cove is cursed.  When Hank returns from the war having lost a hand, they hope– because of what he gave up– their luck will turn.

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The Lifeboat, by Charlotte Rogan.

If you haven’t had enough of Titantic-related survival-at-sea stories, there’s this one, not based upon a true sinking but partially influenced by the first-time-author’s family history.

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Another Woman, by Penny Vincenzi.

Everyone in this book is either another woman (the women) or has another woman (the men) and the plot twists and relationships strain credulity from time to time but Vincenzi, as always, leaves you with a teary eye.  In other words, recommended, as are all her others.

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