Monthly Archives: May 2012

The Family Corleone by Ed Falco

Mario Puzo’s unproduced screenplay has now been adapted into the well-received The Family Corleone by Ed Falco.  While some of the back story isn’t new, Falco does an exceptional job of developing major characters like the temperamental Sonny Corleone and lone wolf Luca Brasi and giving us yet another glimpse of the world of Don Vito.

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Helen Keller In Love, by Rosie Sultan.

Speculative (no pun intended… on spectacles… eyeglasses… seeing… sight) fiction, historical fiction (actually based on oodles of cited sources so really not so speculative, except that HK herself never wrote about it), telling the story of a passionate romantic relationship Helen Keller did have, albeit briefly.

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Boleto, by Alyson Hagy.

You feel as if you’re on a western ranch working with the horses and the cowboys via the attentive prose in this novel about a decent, introspective, young man who hopes a certain filly will be his “boleto” (ticket) out of the rough life of his family farm and family printing business.

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In The Bag, by Kate Klise.

A sort of globe-trotting comedy of errors, like ships passing in the night, Webb and Andrew and Coco and Daisy connect, disconnect, reconnect.  This is a delightful story told through the four voices via email, letters, and narrative.

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The Uninvited Guests by Sadie Jones

Downton Abbey meets Dark Shadows in Sadie Jones’ new novel, The Uninvited Guests.   It’s 1912 and the Torrington-Swift family is at risk of losing Sterne, their beloved British estate while Emerald Torrington is preparing for a small but lavish twentieth birthday party.  However,  things soon go awry when there’s a train wreck nearby and Sterne is inhabited by shaken survivors led by one charismatic man who is not all that he seems.

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The Master’s Muse, by Varley O’Connor.

The Master is George Balanchine, the muse is his 5th (ballerina) wife Tanaquil Le Clercq, and the novel is how they dance after she contracts polio in 1956, written as if it is Le Clercq’s autobiography.

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Lone Wolf by Jodi Picoult

In Jodi Picoult’s words, “Lone Wolf looks at the intersection between medical science and moral choices.”  The characters in Picoult’s previous books (Handle with Care, My Sister’s Keeper, for example) deal with tough issues affecting love, relationships and personal integrity that are thought provoking and affecting.

Lone Wolf is no different.  Naturalist Luke Warren spent two years away from his family (and all humans) to be part of and study wolf packs.  While the experience gave him insight into a different species, it forever changed his relationship with his family.  He and his wife Georgie divorced, his son Edward left abruptly for Thailand and his teenage daughter Cara, who so reveres him, now is forced to face a secret that she will live with forever.

When Luke picks Cara up from a party that has gotten out of hand, they have a terrible car accident.  Now, Luke lies unconscious in a hospital bed with virtually no hope of recovery, and Cara is healing from non-threatening injuries.  Edward returns home, and although he has been away for six years, he is considered next of kin and therefore burdened with the decision of whether to end life support.  While he grapples with his estrangement and his father’s final wishes, Cara cannot let go and challenges her brother in a moral battle that would test the bonds of any family.

Picoult’s writing style for this one is interesting; each character’s first person narrative is in a different typeface, allowing the reader to distinguish who’s telling the story.  Telling each characters perspective with heartache and honesty, Lone Wolf examines life choices and the price for making them.

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