Monthly Archives: June 2012

The Red House by Mark Haddon

The author of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time takes us through seven days of holiday with a family loaded with estrangements, secrets, desires and downright dysfunction.  What’s not to like?  Great follow-up for Haddon.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Staff Picks

Capital, by John Lanchester.

“We Want What You Have.”  And who wouldn’t?  Residents along well-established Pepys Road are receiving curious postcards featuring photos of their homes with this slogan across them.  Who’s behind them?

Leave a comment

Filed under Staff Picks

The Yard by Alex Grecian

After the Jack the Ripper murders cease but remain unsolved, Scotland Yard creates “The Murder Squad.” Now, not only is someone picking off members of the squad, but other grisly murders and a young chimney climber’s death is putting the squad to the test.  One detective, one constable and one innovative coroner are closing in – but is it already too late?

Leave a comment

Filed under Staff Picks

So Far Away, by Meg Mitchell Moore.

Kathleen is an archivist whose current chorus is “all these young girls in trouble” (or words to that effect), past and present and trying to prevent worse in the future.  The troubles are cyberbullying, heroin, and being a young “Bridget,” a 1920’s Irish maid.

Leave a comment

Filed under Staff Picks

You Came Back, by Christopher Coake.

Mark and Chloe are just-about-recovered from losing their young son in a falling-down-the-stairs accident.  Though their marriage did not survive, they did and he is about to propose to Allie while she is content with restauranteur Steve.  Then Connie and her young son move into their former home & complications and questions ensue.

Leave a comment

Filed under Staff Picks

The Book of Summers, by Emylia Hall.

From the summer she is nine ’til the summer she is 16, Beth Lowe, then calling herself (and being called) Erszi, for Erzsebet, the Hungarian Elizabeth (Beth), travels from England to Hungary to live with Marika… after Marika left Erszi and her father she no longer calls her “Mum.”  This book is armchair travel of Hungary, and also of childhood summers.

Leave a comment

Filed under Staff Picks

Alys, Always, by Harriet Lane.

It’s not Alice Kite, who could be any woman or everywoman, but Alys Kyte, wife of famed author Laurence who dies after an auto collision in lowly-copy-editor Frances’ presence (also the word “manipulative,” with “insinuate.”)

Leave a comment

Filed under Staff Picks