Monthly Archives: July 2013

The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman

GaimanWhat a delightful dark fantasy from the author of Coraline and American Gods.  Gaiman’s writing is light but effective and creates a world in which to lose yourself.  Recommended for all adults and older teens.

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The Last Summer of the Camperdowns, by Elizabeth Kelly.

Kelly… is that fateful one when Riddle (yes, that’s really her name) is twelve, “almost thirteen,” as she qualifies it every time her age is mentioned.  … is the summer when she half-witnesses something in a barn that, after not talking about it the first time she is asked, becomes impossible to talk about.

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Fin & Lady, by Cathleen Schine.

SchineBrother, sister, half-brother, half-sister, Fin & Lady become a family of two, having only met once in the past, when Fin’s parents die & Lady’s being considerably older allows her to become his guardian.  Delightful.

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The Never List, by Koethi Zan.

ZanSpookily coinciding with current events (Jaycee Dugard and other recent discoveries of old abductions), I find it easier to read about these horrifying things in novels that seem so real than in memoirs or accounts that creepily are.

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Letters from Skye, by Jessica Brockmole.

BrockmoleDear Patron,

Read this one.  You’ll enjoy the correspondence between “Sue,” in the Isle of Sky, and Davey, in Urbana, Illinois, who meet, via the mail, just before the (World) War (I).

Sincerely, Deer Park Pageturners.

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Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln by Doris Kearns Goodwin

GoodwinThe movie Lincoln is only one facet of this gem by historian/author Goodwin.  Take the time to delve into the many personalities of Lincoln’s Cabinet and why Tolstoy said “he will live as long as the world lives.”

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Ten Things I’ve Learnt About Love, by Sarah Butler.

Butler1.  Of course I have to write this this way.

2.  Because this is how each chapter begins : with a list of ten.

3.  There’s a dying father.

4.  And a dead mother.

5.  And a synesthetic homeless man.

6.  Three daughters.

7.  The City of London.

8.  Connections,

9.  missed connections.

10.  And poetic prose.

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