Monthly Archives: December 2014

The Boston Girl by Anita Diamant

Diamant“How did you get to be the woman you are today?”  Addie Baum’s 22- year old granddaughter wants to know.  So begins a moving novel, rich in emotion and historical detail, about growing up during an era in which the “modern” woman started to emerge.  The novel opens in the year 1915, and describes the life of a young woman dealing with a world that was changing: shorter skirts, woman going to college, celebrity and movie culture on the rise, and opportunities for woman that weren’t imaginable to some.  Through it all, you can appreciate Addie’s adventures and sorrows, her sense of humor, her ability to realize how hard she was on herself…. and perhaps catch a glimpse or two of yourself regardless the century.

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Mr. Mercedes by Stephen King

KingI know what you’re thinking….Stephen King, no way, he’s too scary!  Before you skip this review, know that this is NOT a horror story.  Did you know Stephen King wrote short stories that would later become hit movies like The Shawshank Redemption and Stand By Me?  Here’s a thriller, the first in a trilogy centered around retired cop Bill Hodges.  Hodges is racing against time (and a heart attack) to catch the “perk” who drove a stolen Mercedes through a crowd of early morning job seekers, killing several of them.  Good suspense and compelling characters.

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The Boy Who Drew Monsters by Keith Donohue

Donohue10 year olds Jack Peter Keenan and Nick Weller nearly drowned three years ago.  Jack never leaves the house but spends much of his time drawing and playing with Nick.  Soon his mother Holly hears strange noises in the house and his father Tim sees frightening creatures on the dark roads.  One or two well placed twists make this an unsettling page turner reminiscent of Rod Serling.

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Last Train to Babylon by Charlee Fam

Book Cover  Aubrey is a 20-something girl living in NYC city, far enough away from Long Island and a past she would not like to revisit.  Than Rachel commits suicide, and Aubrey is forced back to Long Island for a funeral she does not plan on actually attending.    Told from Aubrey’s perspective, the book goes back and forth from present time to the past.  An edgy, witty, raw book filled with emotion and suspense.

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Big Little Lies, by Liane Moriarty

JacketTold from three different perspectives, we are immersed into the lives of a group of families living in a small town, connected to one another through the public school their children attend.  Moriarty’s characters are complex, intriguing, funny, and dark.  Read this book and see what little lies led up to murder on Trivia Night!

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